Cavity Walls In New Buildings In South Africa

SANS 10400-XA (Energy Usage in Buildings)

The 2021 SANS 10400-XA revision requires the construction of cavity walls in place of 230 mm solid brick external walls. This energy-saving change is applicable in all the energy zones in South Africa except in zones 3, 5 and 5H.

How wise this course of action is considering the lack of skills in the building trade will have to be seen!

What is a cavity wall?

A cavity wall consists of two skins separated by a hollow space (cavity). The advantage is that a cavity wall gives better thermal insulation than a solid wall. The space between the two leaves of cavity walls reduces heat transmission into the building from outside.

The following are the advantages of cavity walls when compared to solid walls.

  • This type of wall gives better thermal insulation than solid walls.
  • The hollow space between leaves prevents moisture penetration through the wall from the outside. This prevents dampness internally.
  • They also act as good sound insulators.
  • These walls also prevent efflorescence from occurring.

Construction of cavity walls

how to build a cavity wall using DPC and brickforce
window built in on a cavity wall with vertical DPC

The construction of these walls is technically more difficult than for solid 230 mm walls.

  • The cavity between the two masonry leaves should be a minimum of 50 mm. The gap must be consistent from the bottom of the wall to the top.
  • Below the DPC level, the bricklayer must fill up the wall cavity with concrete or mortar before installing the DPC.
  • The bricklayer then installs the DPC at slab level to step down from the slab-level interior wall across the cavity to the outer wall and weep holes. Its purpose is to drain away any water in the cavity towards the weep holes to discharge it outside.
  • Weep holes must be provided in the external leaf above the Damp Proof Course (DPC) at every 4th brick horizontally.
  • The bricklayer must build in wall ties at every 5th course of brickwork vertically and space them horizontally at every second brick to tie the two leaves of brickwork together.
  • Mortar dropping down in the cavity can stop water from draining away. The bricklayer should leave some bricks out temporarily at the DPC level to clear mortar droppings at the end of each day’s work.
  • The normal method of preventing mortar droppings from falling to the base of the cavity is to use a cloth-rapped batten (38 x 38 mm) or specially sized 50 x 38 mm planed to 45 mm. The bricklayer places the batten on the wall ties while building the wall. The bricklayer raises the batten, using wire tied to its ends and then positions it on the next row of ties.
  • Furthermore, the bricklayer should install a vertical DPC on the sides of doors and windows when closing off the cavity wall. This is to prevent water from driving to the inner face.
  • In addition, the bricklayer should install a layer of DPC and weep holes in the cavity above exposed doors and windows similar to the DPC at floor level. This is to prevent moisture from penetrating the inner leaf.
  • At the roof line, the bricklayer should fill or brick up the cavity for two or three courses below the roofline to stiffen and distribute the load over both leaves. He should also build in roof ties at this level to tie down the roof trusses or beams.
  • No wide brick force can be used to span both leaves and cavities of brickwork. A 90 mm width of brickforce will need to be used on every 5th layer of brickwork on both leaves up to window or door height and every course above that until the cavity is closed at roof height.

My Concerns with the new requirements

The Western Cape Province has already been following this practice for many years. Cavity walls are also better for damp prevention than solid walls. The introduction of cavity walls nationally is to satisfy regulatory requirements for building energy efficiency.

However, such sweeping changes to the construction of brick buildings in other areas of the country may have serious consequences because of skills shortages. They may lead or may have led to substandard work because of the lack of sufficient skills and training of bricklayers and their supervisors!

The newer generation of bricklayers and builders never adhered fully to the requirements of the building regulations before with the construction of solid 230 mm walls! Most of them have had no experience with building cavity walls either!

I have listed some of the issues I have seen on building sites below:

  • In my experience, the bricklayers in the building trade never used collar jointing of the solid brick walls leading to weakened wall structures.
  • The bricklayers seldom place the DPC on a half layer of mortar on the brickwork. Instead, they place the DPC directly on the brickwork. This often led to moisture intrusion in the structure at the DPC level.
  • Generally, no bricklayer has installed DPC on the sides or above the door and window openings to prevent moisture intrusion through the wall at the windows and doors inland from the coastal areas.
  • Few bricklayers build in the correct number of layers of brickforce reinforcing above windows and doors.
  • Often, the bricklayers tooth the brickwork of the internal walls to external walls and corners instead of stepping back the brickwork as required.
  • The mixing of large amounts of mortar resulting in the retempering (adding additional water) of mortar is a common practice. This causes weakened mortar and brickwork.

Most of the issues result from a lack of knowledge and training. This includes not only the bricklayers but also the supervisors!

So how do we get the bricklayers to build the more technical cavity walls correctly?

  • One way is to train the supervisors who in turn can train the bricklayers!
  • Various brick associations and training schools offer bricklaying training. The various training associations and schools may be open to do on-site training.
  • Both the supervisors and the bricklayers can learn from videos that show how to build cavity walls. They all have cellphones on which they can view the videos.
  • Articles by the Clay Brick Association can update supervisors and bricklayers with the technicalities of building a cavity wall.

Let us hope the above happens so that new homeowners will have properly constructed homes!

Conclusion

With the correct training, newly built cavity walls will provide the thermal benefit required by the new revision of SANS 10400-XA. In addition, the construction of cavity walls will minimise moisture intrusion into new buildings if constructed properly. They also provide sound insulation benefits.

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THE HOME DETECTIVE » Homeowner » Mould inspection

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Imagine What Can Happen If You Don’t Have A Home Inspection!

home inspection and property inspection
Do not let this happen to you! Be wise! Rather have one of my property inspections like a Comprehensive or Critical Home Inspection in Gauteng or part of the North West province!

Why use THE HOME DETECTIVE for your home inspection?

Firstly, you get the best home inspection and most detailed home inspection report in Gauteng! You not only get a defects report but you also get a property inspection report detailing future maintenance issues! Moreover, my inspection reports include advice for repairs and maintenance which is helpful if you are a DIY enthusiast or handy around the house! 

Secondly, your inspection is performed and the report is produced by a highly qualified and Certified Professional Inspector (CPI) who is a member of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI)!

Moreover, I come highly recommended on Google Business!

There is no doubt that without a home inspection and report, you are at risk! This is especially true with the “Voetstoots” clause in the “Offer to Purchase“!

At The Home Detective, I understand just how stressful it can be to buy a new home. A home is not just what it appears to be on the surface. It can consist of more than 500 different components, some of them very complex. This includes the roof, windows, doors, structural concrete, brickwork, framework, and components such as electrical, plumbing, cooking, heating, and air conditioning systems.

When considering a home for purchase, minor cosmetic repairs are usually acceptable. However, you need to make sure that everything beneath the surface is in good shape.

How I can help you

I will help you reduce your stress and uncertainty when you are looking for a new home. I will help you choose the right property. My Comprehensive or Critical Home Inspection will help reduce the risk of buying a house with structural defects, leaks, dampness and other defects.

Furthermore, I work only for you! My home inspection services give you unbiased, objective information about the property. Above all, I am an independent and impartial home inspector.

In addition, a comprehensive or critical home inspection and report is not going to cost you an arm or a leg! Don’t let the home inspection cost put you off! It may cost a bit, but it could end up saving you many thousands in repairs and maintenance!

My inspection services for your peace of mind

You don’t need to attend the inspection if you do not wish to. Your inspection report with marked-up photos of the defects will clearly illustrate the condition of the home to you. However, attending the home inspection will give you more insight into the property. In addition, you will also be able to raise concerns while I am inspecting and have your questions answered.

Your comprehensive home inspection report will include:

  • Defects of the property and suggestions for repairing them
  • The property’s strong points,
  • Regular maintenance is a feature of any property. The report will give you a good idea of the maintenance you may need to do.
  • For ease of understanding the inspection report will include photographs. I am also happy to give telephone support if required!

Why choose The Home Detective?

At The Home Detective, I strive to ensure my home inspection services and reports are not only the best in Gauteng but are the best in the business. I value customer service above everything else.

I use the latest home inspection technology and equipment. Therefore, you can rest assured that you’ll receive a thorough and detailed property inspection service you won’t find elsewhere!

In addition, I inspect properties in Gauteng from the north of Pretoria to Johannesburg South and from Brits in the Northwest Province to Springs in the east.

All my inspections exceed the minimum requirements of InterNACHI’s Standards of Practice and I observe InterNACHI’s Code of Ethics.

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THE HOME DETECTIVE » Homeowner » Mould inspection

Roof Crocodiling or Alligatoring

WHAT IS ROOF CROCODILING AND HOW DOES IT AFFECT YOUR FLAT ROOF?

flat roof crocodiling of waterproofing
Flat roof waterproofing looks like crocodile skin. This is crocodiling!

Waterproofed concrete and composite flat roofs on residential and commercial buildings require more maintenance than sloped roofs. They react differently to sun and moisture than tiled or sheeted roofs and require more frequent maintenance to ensure they function as they should. One common problem with many flat roofs is crocodiling.

What is Crocodiling?

Crocodiling is a crazed cracking pattern on the surface of the waterproofing. It looks like crocodile skin, which is where the name comes from.

Crocodiling is a sign that your waterproofing is ageing. The sun’s UV rays dry out and damage the waterproofed surface, and after five years or more years, the coating may develop small cracks. The older your roof gets before you repair the crocodiling, the more expensive it will get.

Extreme temperature changes, changing from hot sunshine to sudden cloudbursts and rain, and even hot winter days and very cold nighttime temperatures will cause new cracks to appear and will make existing cracks worse. 

Leaves and debris will allow water to pool on the membrane which, together with the elements, will hasten the deterioration of the protective coating and waterproofing itself.

Continue reading “Roof Crocodiling or Alligatoring”

About Property Inspection

property inspection and maintenance issues

About Home and Property Appraisals in Gauteng

Property inspection and maintenance issues

Having a property appraisal or inspection advises you of the condition of the property before you buy it. In addition, an inspection makes you aware of the present maintenance problems and defects that may result in future maintenance problems. In other words, a property appraisal helps you avoid problems and extra costs you have not budgeted for.

Different categories of home inspection are available:

The most popular category of inspection is a Comprehensive Property Appraisal or Comprehensive Home Inspection.

The following information explains what you need to know about the different types of property appraisals that I can offer you.

A Home Inspection or Comprehensive Property Appraisal

It’s one category of property appraisal you can have done. Six different variations of comprehensive inspections are available.

  1. Home Buyers Inspection
  2. Snag Inspection
  3. Home Sellers Inspection
  4. Homeowner’s Maintenance Inspection
  5. Rental Inspection
  6. Commercial Property Inspection

Note: A property appraisal report is different from a “pest inspection report”. A home inspection report will identify any visual damage caused by termites or wood borers. However, it usually won’t include a full report on the existence of termites or other timber-destroying pests.

1) Home Buyers Inspection

Why do you need one?

A home inspection is your protection against the ‘voetstoots‘ clause. Consequently, when you have made your purchase subject to a home inspection contingency, with a contingency period, you have this inspection done. Furthermore, a Buyer’s Property Appraisal report is a written account, with photos, of the condition of the property. It will tell you about any significant building defects or problems such as rising damp, movement in the walls (cracking), safety hazards or a faulty roof to name a few. Accordingly, you would have this done as part of your condition of the sale so you can identify any problems with the property which, if left unchecked, could prove costly to repair.

Four good reasons why you need a buyer’s home inspection done:

  1. Protection against the voetstoots clause in your Offer to Purchase.
  2. You will know in advance what the problems are.
  3. This allows you to negotiate a lower price for the property i.e. you may have to pay to repair some of the problems.
  4. You can get specialist advice about any major problems and maintenance issues, and how they will affect the property over time.

Of course, the home inspection will be one of many things you will need to consider before buying a property.

2) New Property Appraisal (snag inspection)

A snag or new property appraisal and report covers the same items as a comprehensive home inspection report but it also includes more detail:

  1. A list of minor problems
  2. Recommendation of the repairs and replacement work needed.
  3. Blemishes and physical damage to materials and finishes.

What is a snag?

A snag is a small defect or problem found after building work has been completed. Therefore, it is something that is damaged or broken, not fitted properly or looks unfinished. Some examples are a scratch on a window, a missing screw in a hinge on a door or a chipped tile.

Most snags are cosmetic. However, cracks, hollow floor tiles, and kitchen, cupboard, plumbing and electrical defects can result from poor workmanship.

When’s the best time to make a snagging list?

The best time to make a snag list is when you are ready to take occupation. At this stage, you have not moved in so there is no furniture or stored items that may hide or cover defects.

If you leave it until you have moved in, it becomes harder as your housebuilder could argue that you caused the damage when you moved in. In addition, it is also easier for contractors to work in an empty property for obvious reasons.

However, the builder/developer may legally refuse to give you access to the property before completion, because they still own the property.

Leaving your snag list to be rectified after you have taken occupation of your unit or home can be problematic. This may disrupt your time if you have to be present while the builder rectifies the defects. Furthermore, the builder may have moved on to the next phase of housing or another completely new development.

However, you should report any defects and maintenance problems to your builder/developer. After you have taken occupation you must produce a snag list within 3 months. They will fix the defects as part of your NHBRC warranty.

3) Home Seller’s Inspection

A seller’s inspection (sometimes referred to as a pre-listing inspection) is becoming more popular because it virtually eliminates all the pitfalls and hassles associated with having the buyer do the home inspection.

This is an effective marketing tool that allows your estate agent and prospective buyers to access the report on the Internet.

You share multiple copies of the report with potential buyers who tour the home for sale. Alternatively, InterNACHI will host the report at  www.FetchReport.com. A seller’s inspection is a benefit to all parties in a real estate transaction. It is a win-win-win-win situation.

A seller’s inspection doesn’t kill deals by forcing you to disclose defects you otherwise wouldn’t have known about. Any defect that is serious enough to kill a real estate transaction is likely going to be uncovered eventually anyway. It is best to discover the problem ahead of time before it can kill the deal.

The inspection report becomes a great marketing piece if your property is truly in great shape. In addition, I provide you with a banner to place at the entrance to your home which certifies that your home is “Move-In Ready” if the serious defects have been repaired.

A Seller’s Inspection reveals problems ahead of time, which:

  1. Might make the home show better.
  2. Gives you time to make repairs and shop for competitive contractors.
  3. Permits you to attach repair estimates or paid invoices to the inspection report.
  4. Removes over-inflated buyer-procured estimates from the negotiation table.
  5. The report might alert you to any immediate safety issues found before agents and visitors tour the home.
  6. The report provides a third-party, unbiased opinion to offer to potential buyers.
  7. Your estate agent can use a clean seller inspection report as a marketing tool.
  8. A seller’s inspection is the ultimate gesture of forthrightness on your part.
  9. The report might relieve a prospective buyer’s unfounded suspicions before they walk away.
  10. A seller’s inspection lightens negotiations and 11th-hour re-negotiations.
  11. The report might encourage the buyer to waive the inspection contingency.
  12. The deal is less likely to fall apart, the way they often do when a buyer’s inspection unexpectedly reveals a last-minute problem.

The report also provides full disclosure protection from future legal claims.

4) Home Owners Maintenance Inspection

A maintenance inspection is ideal for newer homeowners and busy homeowners who don’t have the experience or the time to maintain their homes themselves. Furthermore, this type of inspection is also for older or physically disabled homeowners who, nevertheless, want to know what their home’s condition is. It’s the home’s equivalent of a medical checkup.

A Home Maintenance Inspection provides you with a list of any minor repairs that need to be addressed before they become major repairs.

What is a home maintenance inspection?

A Home Maintenance Inspection is a comprehensive inspection just like a homebuyer or seller’s inspection.

I will uncover problems you have not noticed. Furthermore, I will detect the little signs that something is starting to go wrong. This may be small cracks, spots, uneven wear, or fixtures such as faulty geyser installation. In addition, I will also make you aware of the regular maintenance you should be doing in your house.

Like an annual physical, my maintenance inspection catches maintenance issues early on. Therefore, a maintenance inspection can give you the peace of mind of a clean bill of health. Moreover, it’s a practical way to keep little problems from turning into big problems.

What happens during a home maintenance inspection?

I will inspect your home with you, showing you what I find during the maintenance inspection and explaining what it means. You will have a chance to ask questions or get clarifications. Moreover, I will point out things you should be doing regularly to keep all of your home’s systems functioning properly.

Furthermore, you’ll get a written report detailing everything I have found. It will be an itemized punch list to address whenever you choose or have the finances available to do maintenance.

What are the advantages of having a home maintenance inspection?

Once every three to five years, you should have me come out and do a maintenance inspection.

  1. I report minor defects can be repaired before they become major issues.
  2. You receive an unbiased opinion. I have no gain out of the evaluation of things that need repair (e.g., your roof or foundation).
  3. If you do suspect something is in disrepair, it’s wise to call me before you call a repair company. Repair companies have a vested interest in getting work. As a result, you have to be careful in accepting what they say requires repair or replacement.

I am not trying to sell you anything except the truth. 

Rental Inspection

A home inspection to protect the interests of both the landlord and tenant is vital.

The rental inspection will identify the condition of the property and any new issues. Furthermore, rental inspections will provide useful evidence if problems or disputes arise later on.

Initial, midterm and follow-up inspections when tenants are leaving and new tenants are occupying the premises are very affordable.

Commercial Property Inspection

Whether you are considering buying or renting a commercial property it is advisable to have a Commercial Property Inspection. As part of your “due diligence”, I can provide you with a detailed evaluation of the building and its components. Furthermore, I will advise you of the overall condition and make recommendations regarding maintenance and improvements.

Choosing the right inspector to inspect the property

You should always use a suitably certified home inspector. A Certified Professional Inspector and a member of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) is the best choice. An InterNACHI-certified inspector will see through any cosmetic improvements covering up faults that might otherwise be missed by an untrained eye. I am your local Certified Professional Inspector in Gauteng.

Contents of my property appraisal reports

The format and amount of detail in my report will depend on your property type, size, age and condition. As a result, these factors will also influence the cost of my inspection and report.

My home inspection reports adopt a standard format recommended by the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors. In addition, all my reports include marked-up photographs.

My home inspection report will include the information to make you aware of the property’s condition and identify any significant problems.

However, a home inspection report is generally a visual inspection only. Therefore, problems that are hidden inside walls and inaccessible areas may not be identified. Also, most deliberately disguised or hidden defects leave clues which can be detected.

General information

I inspect all accessible parts of the property. These include the following areas:

  • all the interior of the building
  • the exterior of the building
  • roof space and roof structure
  • under-floor space (if it exists)
  • roof exterior
  • the site.

The site

My property assessment report includes the following:

  • garage, carport and garden shed
  • separate laundry or toilet
  • small retaining walls (ie. non-structural)
  • steps
  • fencing and boundary walls
  • surface water drainage
  • stormwater run-off
  • paving and driveways.

Make sure you specify any particular items or areas on the site that you want to have inspected.

Other details in the inspection report

The report includes the following information:

  • your name
  • the address of the inspected property
  • the reason for the inspection
  • date of the inspection
  • the scope of the inspection
  • a summary of the overall condition of the property
  • a list of any significant problems that need fixing
  • if necessary, a recommendation that a further inspection or assessment be carried out by a suitably qualified specialist. This can be a suitably qualified electrician, plumber, roofing contractor, structural engineer etc.

The inspection report summary

The summary is possibly the most important part of the report. It lists the major faults found in the property and its condition considering its age and type.

Things not included in a home inspection

A home inspection report usually will not include:

  • parts of the property that were not or could not be inspected
  • matters outside my expertise
  • an estimate of repair costs
  • minor defects (chipped paint, corners or tiles unless they are structural issues)
  • termite detection.

A home inspection report is not an all-encompassing report dealing with every aspect of the property. Therefore, it’s a report to identify any major and minor problems that are visible at the time of the inspection. In addition, the extent of any problem will depend to a large extent upon the age and type of property.

While the report will give you valuable expert advice, it will not cover everything. To clarify, this is explained by the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors Standards of Practice.

I normally would not check things such as:

  • foundation footings (below the ground, cannot be inspected visually)
  • hidden damp-proofing
  • concealed electrical wiring. However, I do inspect lights, switches, plug points and distribution boards
  • concealed plumbing, drainage and gas installations
  • watering systems
  • alarm and intercom systems
  • appliances such as dishwashers, washing machines, tumble dryers, ducted vacuum systems or hot plates (stoves, hobs and extractors are inspected)
  • television reception

Sectional title properties

With sectional title properties, I inspect and assess the condition of the interior and immediate exterior of the unit. I also include the exclusive use areas in my report. If you want me to inspect other common property areas you will need to request a ‘special-purpose’ or ‘single component’ inspection report.

Minor defects

Most older properties will have minor defects such as blemishes and physical damage to materials and finishes. Therefore, with older houses, I would not normally report on minor defects, minor wear and tear, and minor imperfections. I will only report minor defects if the property is a new home or building.

Factors affecting the inspection report

There are certain conditions you should be aware of that will affect the final report.

These include:

  • problems that are difficult to detect due to weather or other conditions. These conditions can be rising damp or leaks if there has not been any rain
  • the information you provide to the home inspector
  • defects that are deliberately covered up to make an area appear problem-free.

It may be difficult to detect leaks and other problems if services have not been used for some time. For example, if the shower has not been used recently or if it has not rained recently, leaks or dampness may not be obvious. However, even under these conditions, there are normally many clues of such defects that I will detect and report.

Using the inspection report for other purposes

Your property appraisal is carried out specifically for your information. It gives you an expert’s view of the condition of the property you are interested in buying.

It is not a certificate of compliance with any law, warranty or insurance policy against future problems. Nor is it intended to estimate the cost of fixing problems. However, with my report, you will be able to get a rough estimate of the repair cost.

Ordering an inspection

Depending on my workload I will need a minimum of 1½ days’ notice to do an inspection.

When ordering your property assessment, make sure you give yourself enough time to make a purchase decision. Also, you should get the seller’s permission to have the property inspected as early in the sale negotiations as possible. This will help you decide if the property is worth buying. There may be little point in spending money on conveyancing until you know the condition of the property.

Other types of inspection reports

Different types of inspections and appraisal reports  are  available depending on your requirements:

Walkthrough Inspections

Walkthrough inspections are for you if you don’t, at this point, want a full home or commercial property inspection.  This type of inspection can be performed with you, or for you if you live elsewhere, and you need nothing more than subjective observations. 

Therefore, a walk-through is less formal and does not require me to adhere to Standards of Practice or to generate a written report.  I will perform a visual walk-through of the home and provide you with oral or written comments summarizing my observations.

This type of inspection costs far less than a Comprehensive or Critical Home Inspection and about half (50%) the cost of a comprehensive inspection and report. Again, the cost depends on where the property is in my inspection area.

Single Component or Itemised Limited Inspection

I often receive calls from clients who are looking for a home inspection for a single component in the home. For instance, this can be a roof leak, a bulging ceiling, damp problems and so on.

My itemised limited inspection and report is also the cheapest. This inspection costs R2,100.00 depending on where you are in my inspection area. Moreover, if you want additional components inspected at the same time, this will only cost an additional R750.00 per component.

However, if I need to travel further than 25 kilometres to the inspection an additional charge may be applicable.

Critical Home Inspection

This is the home inspection for the budget-conscious!  Comparatively, Critical Home Inspections cost about ¾ of the price of a Comprehensive Home Inspection.

A critical home inspection covers the major components which are the roof, structure, windows and doors, electrical and plumbing.

Damp and Mould Inspection

You should have a mould inspection when you suspect you might have a mould problem in your property. Furthermore, have your property inspected when you experience breathing difficulties (shortness of breath, tightness in the chest, or respiratory irritation). In addition, you may also experience headaches, dizziness, drowsiness, sleep loss and nausea.

If your house has obvious mould contamination such as parts of the wall or ceiling, an inspection is essential. My mould inspection will identify and confirm the true extent of the problem. Furthermore, I will provide recommendations on how to rectify it.

Building Progress Inspection

I will inspect your new home construction, alterations or extensions for progress, quality control, and proper sequencing.

No matter how big or small I can help you.

Give yourself that extra peace of mind by contracting me to monitor your project.

I inspect each step during the construction process step to ensure that there is no sub-standard building. Furthermore, I will check whether the correct ratios of the different mixes are used. I will ensure that the levels and depths of foundations are correct, and walls are built straight, plumb and square according to the construction drawings.

My services are not limited to building construction. I assist in ensuring the correct standard of electrical SABS installations and plumbing regulations are followed

I can inspect the building site on a weekly, fortnightly or monthly basis or on a call-out basis, where I check only on key points of your building project so that you have peace of mind that your investment is getting built to the standards required by the South African Building Regulations.

Furthermore, my pricing is negotiable depending on the number of inspections you require.

Pest inspection report

My Pest Home Inspection report identifies any visual damage caused by termite activity. However, it won’t include the detection of whether termites and other timber-destroying pests still exist.

You should have a pest inspection done as well as a home inspection.  A pest inspection is necessary where termites are a problem.

Fixing problems after having a home inspection

If you end up buying the property you may need to organise repairs or renovations before you move in. If this is the case, you should know some important things.

When using a builder or tradesperson for work where the value is over R1,000 the builder or tradesperson must:

  • be correctly licensed or registered for the work they are doing.
  • provide you with a written contract where the value of work (labour and materials) is over R1,000.00.
  • issue or provide you with certificates of compliance or conformity for electrical, electric fencing, plumbing and gas installations. This applies to any repair or change made to the installation. Furthermore, you must obtain an occupation certificate from the builder for extensions and renovations.

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THE HOME DETECTIVE » Homeowner » Mould inspection

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